Roofing slates of the world part III

Images of hand specimens and thin sections of slates from several world´s locations. Real color of the specimens may vary with respect of shown in the images.

Pizarras del Mundo03

13. Slate from Penrhyn, Wales, UK. This slate is extracted at the historic quarry of Penrhyn, and is very popular in historical buildings all over the UK. The green spots correspond to zones with reduced iron and high contents of Ca and Mg (Borradaile et al. 1990). This color change can be seen in the microphotograph of 200 microns.

14. Carbonate slate from Liguria, Italy. The Liguria slates have carbonate content (see microphotograph of 500 microns) of about 20%. However, this fact does not mean that these slates are more susceptible to weathering than other slates with carbonate contents much lower. The key factor is the specific mineralogy of the carbonate. This slate complies with the EN 12326 requirements, and constitutes a perfect material for roofing when used properly. Sample provided by Euroslate.

15. Slate from Benuza, Castilla y León, Spain. An Ordovician slate, fine-grained with some cubes of pyrite, with smooth surface and dark color. This is a classic roofing slate, i.e., a slate from the green schists facies made of quartz, chlorites and mica. Sample provided by Cupa Pizarras S.A.

16. Slate from Hubei province, China. Fine-grained slate, light colored with a marked tendency to acquire a reddish aspect which makes it very interesting for special cases, since this reddish does not seem to generate rust trails. Sample provided by the Laboratorio del Centro Tecnológico de la Pizarra.

17. Green phyllite from Lugo, Spain. This Cambrian phyllite is also a very special roofing slate, being used for some singular buildings such as the Shizuoka Convention Arts Center in Japan. It is quarried in several colors ranging from grey to green. This is the Verde Xemil variety. Sample provided by Pizarras Ipisa.

18. Slate from Villar del Rey, Badajoz, Spain. A very fine-grained slate with some pyrite cubes and a dark color, in fact this is the darkest slate quarried in Spain due to its content in graphite, up to 2%.  Sample provided by Pizarras Villar del Rey, S.A.

And please remember: There are no bad slates but bad uses. The slate should be used in accordance with the building and environment requirements, so it is critical to know and understand the rock we are dealing with.

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One Response to Roofing slates of the world part III

  1. your post was awesome i am really impasse after reading your post

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