Pathologies – part III

Acting against oxidation

Above all, it must be remembered that oxidation is a purely aesthetic defect, which does not involve the loss of the roof waterproofing. Only in exceptional cases, where the size of the iron sulphide is greater than the plate thickness, the oxidation can break it.

Up: Lateral view of a slate tile, in which the thickness of the iron sulphides is lower than the thickness of the tile itselfDown: The thickness of the iron sulphides is now higher that the thickness of the tile, breaking it when the oxidation develops

Up: Lateral view of a slate tile, in which the thickness of the iron sulphides is lower than the thickness of the tile itself
Down: The thickness of the iron sulphides is now higher that the thickness of the tile, breaking it when the oxidation develops

It is also necessary to know the susceptibility of the slate to oxidation. An experienced technician will have no problem recognizing the existence, abundance and types of iron sulphides present, so it is possible to estimate the oxidizability of a slate variety quite rightly. Also, preoxidation treatments with H2O2 can be very illustrative, although the attack conditions must be carefully checked for no erroneous results.

In recent years there have been proposed two types of oxidation treatments, application of chemical products and passivation of the iron sulphides. The application of chemicals products is done in huge treatment stations located in the same slate producing factory. These products have several disadvantages to be considered, during the application stage and with the effective protection they can give to the slate. Still, there are already slate producing companies applying this type of products, albeit in a restricted way.

Experimental roof with tiles of slate treated with different products and treatments

Experimental roof with tiles of slate treated with different products and treatments

The other type of treatment involves selectively attacking the iron sulphides, weathering first their surface and then coating them with an inert mineral crust that protects against the environmental conditions. This method is effective in theory, and it has not been developed for practical use yet, so its real effectiveness can´t be known.

As a general recommendation, against oxidation on the roof, we should act calmly, first weighing the extent and type of damage, and then considering the possibility of changing the affected tiles. Each case is different, and not always the oxidized tiles are negative. In restoration of historic monuments it is common to search for oxidized tiles to replace the originals. Also in modern buildings, rusted slate offers new attractive textures and colors.

Portugal2007 (84)

Further reading:

Passivation techniques to prevent corrosion of iron sulphides in roofing slates

Oxidación de sulfuros en pizarra ornamental: tratamientos protectores con siloxanos

Protocolo de valoración de la efectividad de productos protectores de pizarra para cubiertas

Sealant composition for roofing slate

About these ads

About vcardenes
http://lnkd.in/apSCxM

2 Responses to Pathologies – part III

  1. tungeland says:

    Hi, This is a Nice pice of work in this site about roofing slates.
    And it is quite usefull when dealing whit slates to other foreign country.
    My problem is to find a god quality slate in the Color of ” light grey” and in tickness for about 18-22 millimeter. Because it has to handle heavy snow up to 1,8 meters. It has to handle fast temperaturs falls, whit and whitout snow. It Culd be winters whit – 30-35 degres, and almost whitout snow. The thinn slates has the problems that thei Culd be make som noise when the sun are warming up the roof, after the night when it has been minus 3 -10 degres.

    Can you recomand some spanish slates whit Good quality !

    Regards
    T.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: